What Is The Composition Of Waterbed Conditioner

The normal tap water that is used for filling a waterbed mattress has microbes and algae. They can attach to mattress walls and cause damage if they are allowed to grow. You can see bubbles in your waterbed if there are many microscopic organisms. This conditioner keeps the living organisms under control.


1

Primary Ingredients

Waterbed conditioners are made by professional supply stores using either sodium Thiosulphate (or sodium Hydroxymethane Sulphonate). Both chemicals are safe and reliable. Mix either one with distilled water to make your own. Waterbed manufacturers recommend that waterbeds be treated every six months. It won’t prolong the period of retreatment if you mix the chemicals too strongly. In six months, the chemicals are gone.

  • To make waterbed conditioner, professional supply shops use either sodium thiosulphate sulphonate or sodium hydromethane sulfurate.
  • Many waterbed manufacturers recommend that waterbeds be treated every six months.


2

Alert for Household Bleach

You can use ordinary household bleach to make some recipes. The bleach can make a hole in your mattress. Clorox bleach formulas are sold by some unscrupulous waterbed dealers.


3

Burping Out Bubbles

Waterbed sellers sell products that “burp” waterbeds from algae and microbes. If left untreated the water may turn green or smelly and cause loud bubbles. A mattress that is well maintained will last seven years.


4

How to Buy and Handle Ingredients

You can buy sodium thiosulphate at your local pool supply store. You can buy sodium hydroxymethane-sulphonate at aquarium shops or on the Internet. Even in very small amounts, breathing or touching any of these chemicals could cause liver injury.


5

Injections

When waterbed mattresses have been neglected for too long, they can develop bad odours. It is important to drain and refill waterbeds every 2 years. An owner may apply “shock” treatments to the water if it smells. This is similar to what’s used for swimming pools with mould and microbe overgrowth. The chemicals in shock treatments can cause more harm than the more subtle ones.

  • Waterbed mattresses can develop bad odours if they are left unattended for too long.
  • An owner may apply “shock” treatments to the water if it smells. This is similar to what’s used for swimming pools with mould and microbe overgrowth.